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Posted in: News, News
2022-11-28 18:00:00

From the Mind of Thomas Jefferson: A Gift for America's Early Ally

In the history of the United States, there has been no stronger alliance than that between America and France. This relationship stretches back to the origins of our country during the Revolutionary War, when France’s aid played a crucial role in America gaining independence from the tyrannical rule of Britain.

Posted in: News, News
2022-11-21 19:00:00

Mayflower's Finest: The Pilgrim Half Dollar

402 years ago, on November 21, 1620, the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts, creating what is now remembered as the Plymouth Colony. These Pilgrims, also known as Puritan Separatists, originally escaped religious persecution under King James I of England in 1609 by moving to the Netherlands. By 1620, however, they aimed their sights away from the European continent and focused on getting across the Atlantic Ocean to America. To celebrate the 300-year anniversary of this historic event, the US Mint struck a commemorative half dollar starting in 1920.

Posted in: News, News
2022-11-07 19:00:00

Who Are The American Women Honored on Quarters in 2023?

The US Mint has announced the next five women to be honored on the American Women Quarter series in the year 2023. This series has brought to the forefront several American women who have had a massive impact on our culture. In the next year, the reverse of the Washington Quarter will showcase such luminaries as Bessie Coleman, Jovita Idar, Edith Kanaka’ole, Maria Tallchief, and Eleanor Roosevelt.

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-31 20:30:00

The Coin Guys Meet Frankenstein: The Monster Errors of Numismatics

We have all heard the story of Doctor Frankenstein, a scientist whose obsession with creating life leads to the birth of a monster constructed from the remains of deceased humans. Written in 1818, the story of Frankenstein is one that is almost as old as American numismatics itself. And although there has never been a numismatist to bring an inanimate object back to life, there certainly have been a few that have created monstrosities of their own. Here are a small handful of errors coins depicting designs you wouldn’t expect to find together. These are the Frankenstein’s Monsters of numismatics.

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-24 17:00:00

Numismatic Superstitions: Coins of the Dead

Superstitions have been prevalent in numismatics for thousands of years. The Colonists of early America believed that a Pine Tree shilling could ward off witches, children around the world will affirm that finding a heads-up penny on the sidewalk is an undeniable sign of good luck, and the Greeks placed coins on the eyes of the dead as payment to be taken to the afterlife. That last practice is commonly referred to as Charon’s obol and you may have seen it in a film or read about it in a book, but what did it really mean?

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-17 17:00:00

Haunting Numismatics: Ghost Coin of the Confederacy

We often hear stories of homes being haunted by past residents, trinkets in curiosity shops holding the souls of their previous owners, and spirits lingering around tombstones where their bodies now lie. Often, these phenomena are condemned to movies and folklore, but very rarely does one of these occurrences take place in the realm of flesh and blood. There is, however, a coin that has haunted numismatics since the onset of the Civil War: the infamous “Ghost Coin” of the Dahlonega Mint in Georgia.

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-10 17:00:00

From a Speech to a Sculpture: How the Family of Eagles Landed on the American Gold Eagle

The American Gold Eagle is a beloved coin that brought gold back to the American people after an over 50 year hiatus. When Ronald Reagan signed the Gold Bullion Act in 1985, he authorized the creation of this stunning coin from newly mined American gold. The obverse showcases the most beautiful design on American coinage, the Saint-Gaudens Gold Double Eagle. As for the reverse, a design was chosen from Miley Busiek, a self-taught artist who worked hard for her recogniton. But Busiek, now known as Miley Tucker-Frost, did not originally envision her art on an American coin. So how did it end up there?

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-04 18:00:00

Rick Tomaska on the 1964 Specimen Kennedy Half Dollar

One of the most mysterious coins in US history, is the 1964 Specimen Kennedy.  Much like the famed 1913 Liberty Head Nickel, this coin should not exist and the exact number of examples struck is unknown.  About a dozen examples have been discovered, and it’s estimated no more than 15 were struck.

Posted in: News, News
2022-10-03 17:00:00

How the Granite Lady Stood Strong When San Francisco Shook

On April 18, 1906, the City of San Francisco was devastated by the greatest natural disaster it had ever seen. At 5:12 AM, before most residents were even awake to see the morning fog roll in from the Bay, an 8.2 magnitude earthquake shook the city for 42 seconds that seemed like eternity. The quake was followed by rampant fires that roared for days on end. When it was all said and done, approximately 25,000 buildings were destroyed.

Posted in: News, News
2022-09-26 18:00:00

The Tale of Josh Tatum and His 1883 Racketeer Nickel

In numismatics, there are several factors that could draw a collector to a particular coin. Some of the most popular coins in US history are those with an interesting story. The 1883 “Racketeer Nickel” is the prime example of an iconic coin whose popularity stems from its wild origin tale.

Posted in: News, News
2022-09-19 17:00:00

Early American Gold: The Journey from Coinage Act to Actual Coinage

Before the United States had struck the world-renowned Saint-Gaudens and Liberty Head Gold coinage, America relied on gold coins struck in other countries such as the Spanish eight escudos. The idea of using foreign coinage in our new country did not sit well with our Founding Fathers as they believed that no country can be independent without its own monetary system. As a result, our first President George Washington signed the Coinage Act of 1792.

Posted in: News, News
2022-09-15 20:00:00

Collector Pays $2+ Million for 62-Pound “Johnny Carson” Gold Bar 

(Los Angeles, California) September 13, 2022 – A collector of California Gold Rush artifacts has paid more than $2 million for a historic 62-pound gold bar recovered from the 1857 sinking of the fabled “Ship of Gold,” the S.S. Central America 

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2022-09-12 18:00:00

The 1909-S VDB Cent: A Tale Synonymous with US Coinage

In every field of collecting, there is a titan that reigns supreme as the most iconic figure. In baseball card collecting, no card is more iconic than the T206 Honus Wagner. To stamp collectors, nothing matches the luster of the 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta. In numismatics, the supreme figure is the 1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent.

Posted in: News, News
2022-09-06 16:00:00

Christian Gobrecht: The First Prolific US Coin Designer

One of the earliest and most prolific designers in the history of the US Mint is Christian Gobrecht, who served as the third Chief Engraver and was responsible for placing designs on a dozen coins which lasted long beyond his tenure.

Posted in: News, News
2022-08-29 17:00:00

Eight Essential Error Coin Varieties

Since the dawn of coin collecting, error coins have gained some of the highest praise in the hobby. There are eight different major error varieties you may encounter on your collecting journey. Any of these errors can warrant a handsome premium, so it is incredibly useful to be able to spot one when you see it.

Posted in: News, News
2022-08-22 17:00:00

Comparing Ancient Coinage to Modern Manufacture: Hammered, Cast, and Punched Coins

Over the past 230 years, the US Mint has vastly improved its methods of producing coins. But even the technology from 1790 was vastly different from the earliest days of coin manufacturing. Early civilizations, like the Ancient Greeks and China during the Qin Dynasty, struck coins using methods that are no longer used today for circulating currency.

Posted in: News, News
2022-08-15 17:00:00

Ladies of Liberty: Elsie Stevens and the Mercury Dime

The Winged Liberty Head Dime, more commonly known as the Mercury Dime, has many controversies around its design. For one, the obverse is meant to depict Lady Liberty, not the Roman God of Travel Mercury, despite the winged cap they have in common. The second and more mysterious controversy is whether the model for Liberty was the American Venus herself, Audrey Munson, or the wife of a Pulitzer Prize winning poet.

Posted in: News, News
2022-08-08 17:13:00

The Stories Behind James B. Longacre’s Prolific Works

Few have left an impact on American coinage like that of James Barton Longacre. Best known for serving as the fourth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his passing in 1869, Longacre also has an impressive resume of incredible coins he gave our country, including the Liberty Head Gold Double Eagle. Longacre practically performed a complete overhaul of US coinage, and here is a chance to learn about the coins he brought to life.

Posted in: News, News
2022-08-01 15:00:00

The Influence of Jean-Antoine Houdon: The Sculptor of Founding Fathers

When researching American coinage, the name Jean-Antoine Houdon appears several times as inspiration for the designs featured on the Jefferson Nickel, Franklin Half Dollar, and the Washington Quarter. But who was Houdon and why was he so influential among Founding Fathers?